Launching the Maroondah Workplace Wellbeing Project

Launching the Maroondah Workplace Wellbeing Project

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Launching the Maroondah Workplace Wellbeing Project

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The Maroondah Workplace Wellbeing Project is an exciting new initiative that is designed to enable:

  1. local businesses and other organisations to learn about good wellbeing practice, measure
    levels of wellbeing for their workplaces and implement strategies to enhance the wellbeing
    of their people;
  2. workers in Maroondah to assess their personal wellbeing against a best practice framework
    and use simple tools and practical tips to create their own personal wellbeing plan; and
  3. both Communities of Wellbeing and Maroondah City Council to measure the state of
    workplace wellbeing in the local community as an aid to ongoing planning and evaluation of
    workplace wellbeing initiatives in the local community.

Why do you want to sign up?

There are some really significant business imperatives:
1. We need to meet our positive duty to eliminate or minimise psychosocial hazards
and sexual harassment.
2. We are suffering unprecedented levels of mental illness and burnout and we need to
find ways to help our people through investment in their wellbeing.
3. We are challenged to find and retain the people that we need to succeed in our
organisation and we need to get better at that.
4. As business owners and managers, we need to invest in our own wellbeing so that
we are OK and we can lead the way positively in our organisations and our
communities.

And, of course, you will be making a contribution to wellbeing in your local business community. 

About the PERMAH Survey

The PERMAH Workplace Wellbeing Survey is a centrepiece of Business Victoria’s small
business workplace wellbeing programs and the instrument used by the Australian Human
Resources Institute to measure workplace wellbeing nationally.
It is derived from the work of Professor Martin Seligman, a luminary in the field of positive
psychology.
The Michelle McQuaid Group, developers of the survey, have recently added additional
content to address the 14 psychosocial hazards contained in the Model Code for Managing
Psychosocial Hazards at Work published last year by Safe Work Australia.
So organisations which participate in this project will not only learn more about good
wellbeing practice and get a line of sight on where that is in their businesses, they will also
start to address their positive duties in assessing risks associated with psychosocial hazards
and consulting their people about those things.

PROGRAM PARTICULARS
1.Maroondah Workplace Wellbeing Survey – participating organisations undertake
the survey from mid-September to mid-October
2. Free workshops:
a. Understanding PERMAH: 9.30 – 11.30, Wednesday 11 October 2023
b. Leveraging Character Strengths, 9.30 – 11.30, 18 0ctober 2023
c. Managing Psychosocial Hazards, 9.30 – 11.30, 25 October 2023
3. Celebration – event presenting aggregated data for community and showcasing
organisational stories of success.
PRICING BENEFITS
Businesses with 10 or more employees will be able to access special pricing for a 12 month
sub-licence for the PERMAH Workplace Wellbeing Survey and the Psychosocial Hazard Panel
Add-on as follows:
PERMAH SUB-LICENCE – NORMALLY $1997 – NOW $499
PSYCHOSOCIAL HAZARD ADD-ON – NORMALLY $799 – NOW $499
For businesses with less than 10 employees, there will be options for debriefs from
professionally accredited PERMAH consultants at heavily discounted (or free) rates.
THE BONUS
Every employee who does the survey gets their own personal report and the tools and
tips to develop their own personal wellbeing plan….for free.

Want to sign up?

Go to http://communitiesofwellbeing.org.au/mww/ and register.

Our Practice Leader, Peter Maguire is the Project Leader and, if you have any questions, give him a call on 0438 533 311 or email info@poswork.com.au.

 

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

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It starts with why

It starts with why

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It starts with why

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We love Simon Sinek’s Golden Circle and use it as the starting point for developing a strategy on pretty much anything from an overall business plan to program design and workshops and communications and social media etc. We start with “WHY” and then move to “HOW” and “WHAT” and then we add on “WHERE” and “WHEN”.

Here is a bit of background on the theory behind his Golden Circle model.

Simon Sinek’s Golden Circle is a concept he introduced in his book and TED Talk titled “Start With Why.” The Golden Circle provides a framework for understanding the fundamental drivers behind successful individuals, organizations, and movements. It consists of three concentric circles: Why, How, and What.

  1. Why: At the core of the Golden Circle is the question of “Why?” Sinek argues that truly exceptional leaders and organizations start with a clear sense of purpose or belief—why they exist and why they do what they do. The “Why” represents the underlying motivation and values that inspire action and resonate with people on a deeper level.
  2. How: The next circle is “How.” This represents the unique approach or guiding principles through which an organization or individual pursues their purpose. It involves the actions, strategies, and processes that differentiate them from others in achieving their goals.
  3. What: The outermost circle is “What.” This refers to the tangible results or products an organization produces or the services they provide. It represents the visible outputs, such as the products they sell or the tasks they perform.

Sinek’s key proposition is that most organizations communicate from the outside in, starting with the “What” and moving towards the “Why.” However, he suggests that truly influential leaders and organizations communicate from the inside out, starting with the “Why” and moving towards the “What.” By focusing on the “Why” and effectively communicating their purpose, they can inspire others and build deep loyalty and engagement.

The research behind Sinek’s Golden Circle draws on various fields such as psychology, biology, and neuroscience. Sinek highlights the importance of the limbic system—the part of the brain responsible for emotions, decision-making, and behavior—in influencing human behavior and decision-making. He argues that by appealing to the emotional “Why,” leaders can tap into the part of the brain that drives loyalty, engagement, and trust.

While Sinek’s concept is not based on a specific scientific study, it synthesizes research findings and provides a practical framework that resonates with many people, offering insights into effective leadership, communication, and building successful organizations.

 

Want to know more about how we can help you to find your WHY? Call us on 1300 108 488 or email info@poswork.com.au.

 

 

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

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A Better Change Process

A Better Change Process

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A Better Change Process

meeting

We chose the Appreciative Inquiry process as our change management methodology because we believe (and the evidence shows) that it delivers much more positive results and a much more positive, inclusive and collaborative experience for participants than traditional change management processes. Her is she background on what it is, how it works and why it is beneficial.

Appreciative Inquiry (AI) is a problem-solving and change management approach that focuses on identifying and amplifying the positive aspects of an organization or system. It emphasizes the exploration of what works well, the discovery of strengths and opportunities, and the envisioning of a desirable future. AI is rooted in the belief that organizations and individuals grow and thrive by building on their strengths rather than focusing solely on fixing problems.

The process of AI typically follows a four-phase cycle known as the 4-D model:

  1. Discovery: This phase involves identifying and appreciating the positive qualities, experiences, and successes within the organization. It includes interviews, surveys, and other data collection methods to gather stories and examples of what has worked well in the past.

  2. Dream: In this phase, participants collectively envision a desired future based on the discoveries from the previous phase. They engage in creative and collaborative exercises to imagine an ideal state for the organization and explore possibilities.

  3. Design: Here, the focus shifts to designing practical and actionable strategies to realize the envisioned future. Participants identify specific steps, goals, and initiatives that can help move the organization toward the desired state. They leverage the strengths and positive elements identified earlier to shape the design of these initiatives.

  4. Destiny (or Delivery): The final phase involves the implementation and execution of the designed strategies. The organization takes concrete actions, monitors progress, and adjusts its approach as needed. This phase emphasizes learning, adaptation, and ongoing improvement based on feedback and results.

Appreciative Inquiry is beneficial for several reasons:

  1. Positive focus: Unlike traditional problem-solving approaches, AI places emphasis on what is already working well, fostering a positive mindset and energizing participants. This approach creates a more engaging and motivating environment for change.

  2. Strengths-based approach: By identifying and amplifying strengths, AI helps organizations build upon their existing capabilities and resources. It encourages individuals to leverage their skills and talents, leading to increased self-confidence and a sense of empowerment.

  3. Collaboration and engagement: AI is a participatory process that involves multiple stakeholders within an organization. It promotes collaboration, communication, and shared ownership of the change process. This involvement enhances employee engagement, buy-in, and commitment to the desired future.

  4. Sustainable change: By focusing on strengths and positive elements, AI generates momentum for sustainable change. The approach builds on what is already successful, creating a foundation for continuous improvement and long-term growth.

  5. Innovation and creativity: Appreciative Inquiry encourages participants to think creatively and explore new possibilities. By envisioning an ideal future, organizations can generate innovative ideas and approaches that may have otherwise been overlooked.

  6. Organizational learning: AI promotes a learning culture within organizations. By reflecting on past successes and applying them to future endeavors, organizations can develop a deeper understanding of their strengths and capabilities, fostering a continuous learning and improvement mindset.

Overall, Appreciative Inquiry offers a constructive and positive approach to organizational change, empowering individuals, fostering collaboration, and enabling sustainable growth and improvement.

 

Want to know more about how you can use Appreciative Inquiry to run better change management programs? Call us on 1300 108 488 or email info@poswork.com.au.

 

 

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

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Get set for 2022

Get set for 2022

Blogs and Stories

GET SET FOR 2022

Author: Peter Maguire
Published On:
people better workplace team

So 2021 is done and dusted and many of us will be glad to see it gone (we said that about 2020 too, didn’t we?)

A New Year is here albeit that many of the challenges of the last couple of years with COVID and the downstream effects of COVID will be with us for some time to come. Some of these effects (eg the growth of hybrid work models and expectations) are permanent. 

Ready

So what does the new world of work look like for you? And what does this mean for you in 2022? Spend a little time on reflection – what have you learned and what are you going to do with that learning in the year ahead. Ready yourself by thinking about all of the elements that are at play in your working life (as reflected in our EngageMentality coaching model):

  • The roles that you play (the things you do and the technical knowledge and skills that help you to do those things well)
  • The relationships you have (what you rely on others for and what they rely on you for)
  • Values and how you live them (whether they are your values or your employer’s, how does you behaviour align with those values)
  • Your strengths and how you can use them (giving you the opportunity to be yourself and optimise your potential)
  • Your wellbeing (how you look after you)

If you want some insights on your strengths, the free VIA Character Strengths Survey is a great tool – access it at https://www.viacharacter.org

Likewise the free PERMAH survey is a great tool for assessing your wellbeing – get that at https://permahsurvey.com  

Get set

Now that you have worked out what the priorities for the year are for you in each of those 5 areas, it is time to set some goals and make sure that they are SMART goals:

  • Specific – the goal is clearly defined
  • Measurable – there is a means of assessing your progress
  • Achievable – even if it is a stretch, the goal is one that can be realised  
  • Realistic – the goal is not too much of a stretch or something that you don’t have the means to achieve in the time frame
  • Timebound – there is a timeframe for achievement of the goal

Don’t forget to cover off each of the 5 elements of your working life as per our EngageMentality model (roles+relationships+values+strengths+wellbeing) – try to have at least one goal for each element.

And make sure you have a plan as to how you are going to achieve your goals and who you need help from to do that. A simple spreadsheet with 4 columns is a clear and simple way to record this and set your self up to succeed:

  1. What? Your objective
  2. How? The actions you are going to take
  3. Who? You and anyone else involved in the actions
  4. When? The timeline for when the actions are to happen

Go

So now you have your plan done, it is time to start implementing it and that means living it every day.

So don’t just file it away in one of your folders or your filing cabinet if you still have one of those. Keep it handy and revisit it at least one each month to check on how you are going. That is also an opportunity to recalibrate.

As we all know very well from the last couple of years in particular, things can change quickly and we need to be able to adapt quickly to changed circumstances. That is just part of life now.

Finally, you might think about getting a coach to help you in managing your personal plan. In looking for a coach, ask them how they could assist you in each of the 5 elements noted above. Also ask them about their strengths to see if they have it in them to bring what you need to the conversation.

Wishing you a fabulous 2022! 

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

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What is the best way to say thank you?

What is the best way to say thank you?

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What is the best way to say thank you?

Author:
Published On:
gratitude

A recent article by Elizabeth Hopper in Greater Good Magazine reports on a new study into what the most effective way to say thank you is.

219 college students from the USA and Taiwan participated in a gratitude activity in which they wrote about three things they were grateful for over a two week period. They were then asked to thank the person involved by their preferred method (in person, by video call or via text).

At the beginning and end of the two weeks, they all competed surveys to measure their feelings of wellbeing, connections with others, depression, loneliness and happiness.

Th researchers found that people who expressed gratitude increased their wellbeing with little difference in effectiveness of the method used to say thank you. Video calls were just as effective as meeting in person which (given the virtual world that we have been living in) probably should not come as that much of a surprise. Texting was rated as only slightly less effective but still of value.

However, one of the other findings was that people found expressing gratitude in person a bit more embarrassing than doing it by text.

You can access the full article here.

 This is why there is tremendous value in a platform like ShareTree which builds a culture of gratitude in organisations expressing it through the lens of virtues and character strengths. It also leverages these expressions of gratitude as a positive means of understanding character strengths and growing our own awareness of and capabilities in our character strengths.

That is why we chose ShareTree as one of our preferred platforms for helping ourselves and our clients and communities to flourish using strengths for wellbeing.

Check out ShareTree in this video and, if you are interested in exploring it further, call Peter Maguire on 0438 533 311 or email us at info@poswork.com.au.

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

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A remarkable outcome

A remarkable outcome

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A REMARKABLE OUTCOME

Author:
Published On:
people better workplace team

A number of years ago, I consulted to an organisation which was wrestling with a lot of challenges with its business and its people. The organisation had close on 200 staff and business units spread across Australia.  

Undertaking an initial diagnostic, we discovered that there were significant problems and work to be done in a lot of areas – on organisational structure, in HRM systems and processes, in communications, in staff engagement and trust and in staff wellbeing. 

The findings were not really much of a surprise to management albeit that the depth of the challenges ahead were probably a bit more than was expected. 

10 months later, when we went back to take another look, you wouldn’t recognise the organisation from the one that we had explored not that long ago. People were excited about the organisation, felt engaged and well-supported by their managers and were happily involved in practical HR processes that worked.

In fact, one of the staff that I interviewed told me: “Thank you for helping us – you have changed our lives!”

Needless to say, we were blown away at the scope of the change that had been wrought in less than a year. Even more so, when we discovered that, midway through the year, there had been a major restructure with 30% of middle managers being retrenched and yet they had still achieved remarkable positive change.

So what happened? 

In essence, what happened is a best practice lesson in change management which had 6 key attributes.

Management owned it

The management group took all of the feedback from the diagnostic on board without exception and committed to acting on it. There was no cover up, there were no excuses but there was honesty and vulnerability. The organisation then invested in a Project Team led by a senior manager to work on finding and implementing solutions to the problems identified in the diagnostic report.

Leaders engaged with people to work on the project

The Project Leaders  decided to set up a Project Team with staff representatives from all areas of the business. Selection criteria were developed and people applied to be on the Project Team and then were selected on merit having regard to the selection criteria. The role involved not just having a say about the issues raised but also actively working on solutions and leading their implementation in their own teams. 

People had genuine voice

The Staff Representatives worked with their own teams to communicate what the Project Team was doing and initiatives that were being planned as well as to generate ideas from their own teams that they could bring back to the Project Team. Because people saw that their contributions were genuinely being considered and in some cases influenced the way a matter was to be dealt with, they became more engaged and positive about the Project.

Strategic management of agenda for change and communications

The Project Leaders developed a simple and practical methodology for consistently managing agenda items and their roll-out across the organisation. The Project Team identified a set of core challenges that came out of the Diagnostic Report and then set to work on these one at a time using the same methodology. This involved putting together a packet of communications and tools for each of the challenges and training Staff Representatives in how to deliver those with their teams. Project Leaders did the same with the management group. Everyone was getting the same messages delivered in the same way as well as having the opportunity to have their say right across the organisation.

Fun and celebration

The Project Leader ensured that the activities undertaken in support of the project had an element of play and fun not just for the Project Team but also in the packets that they rolled out to teams across the business. The Project Team also celebrated progress with each of the challenge packets and senior management acknowledged the successes so everyone felt involved and valued for their contributions.

Time and money 

 Management invested the time and the money to make this work, treating it commercially as an organisational priority. The Project Leaders had dedicated roles in the project and were freed up to do those. The Staff Representatives were provided with the time to participate actively on the Project Team and in their own teams and people across the organisation were all allowed the time to engage and participate in the process.    

The role that I played in the organisation was simply to have conversations with people across the business about what life was like for them – what worked and what could be better – and then present that information back to management in a structured and positive way (ie what were the strengths and where were the opportunities for improvement). Today, this is what we do in our Better Workplace Projects.

There can be nothing more fulfilling for a consultant than to see an organisation take on that feedback, to really own it and do something positive about it. That is why this is an experience that I am truly grateful for.

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

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