Gallup tells us how to engage employees in 2024

Gallup tells us how to engage employees in 2024

Blogs and Stories

Gallup tells us how to engage employees in 2024

meeting

Gallup has released a “2024 Employee Engagement Strategy Checklist” in which it tells us that 44% of employees worldwide say they are stressed and proposes some things that organisations can do to get people more engaged and less stressed. 

Here is Gallup’s list:

  1. Check in on your managers because they are more likely to be feeling burned out and stressed and you need them to feel supported and capable of leading their people effectively.
  2. Prepare managers to have meaningful conversations with employees in which they recognise strengths and achievements, set and refine goals and priorities and support then in relationships and collaboration.
  3. Prioritise promoting vision and purpose, especially among remote workers for whom Gallup’s research says that only 28% feel connected to their organisation’s mission and purpose.
  4. Measure engagement to show employees that you care about their feedback and want to know how they are doing.
  5. Take action on survey results – nothing builds positive momentum for an engagement initiative more than asking for feedback, doing something about it and sharing and celebrating positive results.

They say that their research shows that 80% of employees who say they have received meaningful feedback in the past week are fully engaged, regardless of how many days they worked in the office.

When it comes to having meaningful conversations with employees, Gallup said that they should include:

  1. Recognition or appreciation of recent work
  2. Collaboration and relationships
  3. Current goals and priorities at work
  4. Employee strengths and the things that they do well

How long should these conversations be? If they are done regularly (ie weekly), they should take no longer than 15 to 30 minutes.

Our EngageMentality Model

This is a continuous coaching model which incorporates all of the features that Gallup recommends plus more.

We did our own research on the things that we believe impact on an employment experience and by extension employee engagement and wellbeing – these “coaching lenses” are:

  1. Roles  – the job that I do plus any of those other responsibilities that I might take on as a leader or an employee or safety representative or first aider, etc
  2. Relationships – I rely on certain people for certain things and others rely on me for certain things
  3. Values and behaviours – the behavioural attributes that we want to see practised in our organisation to make it respectful, inclusive and high performing
  4. Strengths – using the VIA Character Strengths framework to use a strengths-based approach which optimises opportunities for me to use my signature strengths and to work on and be supported with my lesser strengths
  5. Wellbeing – using the PERMAH workplace wellbeing survey, build on my psychological safety, life balance and overall wellbeing. 

We explore and address each of those items through a process of:

  1. Positioning – doing a stocktake of where I sit in each of those areas
  2. Planning – identifying the actions that I want to take for my performance and development, timelines for doing that and supports that I need and any people who are involved
  3. Performing – implementing my plan and catching up with my manager each week for a coaching session
  4. Presenting – providing me with the opportunity to showcase my achievements in performance and development and areas for further development 

The coaching conversations simply involve asking and answering these 4 questions in the context of each of the 5 coaching lenses:

  1. What has worked well (celebrate)?
  2. What has been a struggle (recalibrate)?
  3. What has changed (update)?
  4. What are we going to do about all of that (activate)?

If you would like to explore our EngageMentality process or any other of our PosWork programs for your workplace, please call us on 1300 108 488 or email info@poswork.com.au.

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

LET'S HAVE A CHAT

Upgrade empathy to compassion

Upgrade empathy to compassion

Blogs and Stories

Upgrade empathy to compassion

meeting

We hear a lot about empathy being an essential quality for good leadership, right? It is a nice sentiment that a leader can put themselves in another’s shoes and see the world or an issue from their perspective, right? But is that enough?

Let’s start with the basics – what is empathy? Empathy is our feeling of awareness toward other people’s emotions and an attempt to understand how they feel.

It doesn’t mean that, even if you can put yourself in that other person’s shoes, you are going to do anything about it.

For example, I could see someone being humiliated by their boss and I could imagine how that might make them feel ie I might empathise with their situation. Is that where my responsibility ends or is there something more?

Of course, there is more if I am not just going to be another bystander – I need to want to help.

That is where compassion is a step up from empathy. Compassion is an emotional response to empathy or sympathy and creates a desire to help.  I empathise with the person and their situation and then I take action to help.

Compassionate leaders not only understand the emotions of their people but actively listen to them and seek solutions to support them and to  alleviate their struggles.

On the other hand, empathy alone may fall short in driving tangible change. Leaders who solely rely on empathy might find themselves navigating the emotional complexities of their team without necessarily addressing underlying issues.

While empathy creates a connection, compassion propels leaders to make a meaningful impact. Effective leadership requires a delicate balance between understanding the emotions of others and taking decisive actions to enhance the collective well-being. Leaders who blend empathy with compassion create an environment that values both emotional understanding and proactive problem-solving, both key components of psychologically safe workplaces.

Interested in learning more about how we can help you to learn about compassionate leadership? Call us on 1300 108 488 or email info@poswork.com.au.

 

 

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

LET'S HAVE A CHAT

Reflections on the Strength of Love

Reflections on the Strength of Love

Blogs and Stories

Reflections on the Strength of Love

chalk writing choose direction

Love is one of the three character strengths that comprise the Virtue of Humanity.

Humanity describes strengths that manifest in caring relationships with others. These strengths are interpersonal and are mostly relevant in one-on-one relationships.

What is love?

Love as a character strength, rather than as an emotion, refers to the degree to which you value close relationships with people, and contribute to that closeness in a warm and genuine way. 

Where kindness can be a behavioural pattern applied in any relationship, love as a character strength really refers to the way you approach your closest and warmest relationships. 

Love is reciprocal, referring to both loving others and the willingness to accept love from others. 

There are four types of love, each with a biological and evolutionary base:

  • Attachment love: parent for child; child for parent
  • Compassionate/altruistic love: kindness
  • Companionate love: friendship
  • Romantic love: spouse/partner/boyfriend/girlfriend

Why is love of value?

  • Love tends to facilitate tolerance, empathy and forgiveness in relationships which contribute to the health and longevity of those relationships.
  • Loving and secure relationships can provide a sense of meaning and purpose in life.
  • Love is associated with healthy patterns of communication such as compromise and the ability to engage effectively in conflict with others.

A couple of questions to consider

  • What are the ways in which you express love to others and how is it received?
  • How well do you receive love? It is often harder to give than to receive but good relationships are a two-way street. Do signs of love make you uncomfortable or afraid of what others may expect from you

Some things that you can do to practise love

  • Journal about loving relationships in general, reflecting on what is most valued in a healthy, loving relationship. Put one of your insights into action.
  • Carve out some time each week to experience uninterrupted quality time in your closest relationship.
  • Go out of your way to offer support to co-workers when you see they are stressed or having a bad day. Give them the gift of supportive words and your honest concern. 

For more information on the strength of hope, go to https://www.viacharacter.org/character-strengths/love

If you are interested in exploring how the practice of Character Strengths might be of benefit to your business and culture, contact Peter Maguire on 0438 533 311 or at info@poswork.com.au.

Acknowledgement: the primary reference for this post is “The Power of Character Strengths: Appreciate And Ignite Your Positive Personality” by Ryan M. Niemiec & Robert E. McGrath (An Official Guide From The VIA Institute on Character)

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

LET'S HAVE A CHAT

Perspectives on the Strength of Fairness

Perspectives on the Strength of Fairness

Blogs and Stories

Perspectives on the Strength of Fairness

chalk writing choose direction

Fairness is one of the three character strengths that comprise the Virtue of Justice.

Justice describes strengths that help you connect in community or group-based situations.

What is fairness?

Fairness is treating people justly, not letting your personal feelings bias your decisions about others. You want to give everyone a fair chance, and believe there should be equal opportunity for all, though you also realize that what is fair for one person might not be fair for another.

Fairness is a cognitive judgment capacity that involves reasoning and making judgments. It involves 2 types of reasoning:

  • Justice reasoning which emphasizes logic and weighing principles to determine moral rights and responsibilities.
  • Care reasoning which includes empathy and compassion; the ability to put yourself in somebody else’s shoes.

When you are at your best, you use fairness to actively work to establish equity and respect for all.

Why is fairness of value?

  • Fair-minded individuals are more likely to engage in positive, prosocial behaviours and less likely to engage in illegal and immoral behaviours.
  • A sensitivity to issues of morality and justice increases self-reflection and self-knowledge.
  • Having a good moral compass enables you to navigate conflictual situations more effectively.

A couple of questions to consider

  • What are the circumstances in which it is easier or harder for you to compromise to try to achieve a fair outcome for everyone?
  • How do you reconcile your sense of fairness with the reality that “life is not fair”?

Some things that you can do to practise fairness

  • Consider ways to be fairer with friends or family such as thinking about the amount of quality time you spend with each person and making adjustments accordingly. 
  • Include someone in a conversation who is as newcomer or typically excluded from groups.
  • Be fair to yourself by examining the amount of time you spend on your own health and self-care versus time spent on helping others. Take action based on what is fair for both you and others.

For more information on the strength of fairness, go to https://www.viacharacter.org/character-strengths/fairness

If you are interested in exploring how the practice of Character Strengths might be of benefit to your business and culture, contact Peter Maguire on 0438 533 311 or at info@poswork.com.au.

Acknowledgement: the primary reference for this post is “The Power of Character Strengths: Appreciate And Ignite Your Positive Personality” by Ryan M. Niemiec & Robert E. McGrath (An Official Guide From The VIA Institute on Character)

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

LET'S HAVE A CHAT

Launching the Maroondah Workplace Wellbeing Project

Launching the Maroondah Workplace Wellbeing Project

Blogs and Stories

Launching the Maroondah Workplace Wellbeing Project

flashing neon sign

The Maroondah Workplace Wellbeing Project is an exciting new initiative that is designed to enable:

  1. local businesses and other organisations to learn about good wellbeing practice, measure
    levels of wellbeing for their workplaces and implement strategies to enhance the wellbeing
    of their people;
  2. workers in Maroondah to assess their personal wellbeing against a best practice framework
    and use simple tools and practical tips to create their own personal wellbeing plan; and
  3. both Communities of Wellbeing and Maroondah City Council to measure the state of
    workplace wellbeing in the local community as an aid to ongoing planning and evaluation of
    workplace wellbeing initiatives in the local community.

Why do you want to sign up?

There are some really significant business imperatives:
1. We need to meet our positive duty to eliminate or minimise psychosocial hazards
and sexual harassment.
2. We are suffering unprecedented levels of mental illness and burnout and we need to
find ways to help our people through investment in their wellbeing.
3. We are challenged to find and retain the people that we need to succeed in our
organisation and we need to get better at that.
4. As business owners and managers, we need to invest in our own wellbeing so that
we are OK and we can lead the way positively in our organisations and our
communities.

And, of course, you will be making a contribution to wellbeing in your local business community. 

About the PERMAH Survey

The PERMAH Workplace Wellbeing Survey is a centrepiece of Business Victoria’s small
business workplace wellbeing programs and the instrument used by the Australian Human
Resources Institute to measure workplace wellbeing nationally.
It is derived from the work of Professor Martin Seligman, a luminary in the field of positive
psychology.
The Michelle McQuaid Group, developers of the survey, have recently added additional
content to address the 14 psychosocial hazards contained in the Model Code for Managing
Psychosocial Hazards at Work published last year by Safe Work Australia.
So organisations which participate in this project will not only learn more about good
wellbeing practice and get a line of sight on where that is in their businesses, they will also
start to address their positive duties in assessing risks associated with psychosocial hazards
and consulting their people about those things.

PROGRAM PARTICULARS
1.Maroondah Workplace Wellbeing Survey – participating organisations undertake
the survey from mid-September to mid-October
2. Free workshops:
a. Understanding PERMAH: 9.30 – 11.30, Wednesday 11 October 2023
b. Leveraging Character Strengths, 9.30 – 11.30, 18 0ctober 2023
c. Managing Psychosocial Hazards, 9.30 – 11.30, 25 October 2023
3. Celebration – event presenting aggregated data for community and showcasing
organisational stories of success.
PRICING BENEFITS
Businesses with 10 or more employees will be able to access special pricing for a 12 month
sub-licence for the PERMAH Workplace Wellbeing Survey and the Psychosocial Hazard Panel
Add-on as follows:
PERMAH SUB-LICENCE – NORMALLY $1997 – NOW $499
PSYCHOSOCIAL HAZARD ADD-ON – NORMALLY $799 – NOW $499
For businesses with less than 10 employees, there will be options for debriefs from
professionally accredited PERMAH consultants at heavily discounted (or free) rates.
THE BONUS
Every employee who does the survey gets their own personal report and the tools and
tips to develop their own personal wellbeing plan….for free.

Want to sign up?

Go to http://communitiesofwellbeing.org.au/mww/ and register.

Our Practice Leader, Peter Maguire is the Project Leader and, if you have any questions, give him a call on 0438 533 311 or email info@poswork.com.au.

 

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

LET'S HAVE A CHAT

Latest Gallup State of the Workplace report is in and…

Latest Gallup State of the Workplace report is in and…

Blogs and Stories

Latest Gallup State of the Workplace report is in and…

flashing neon sign

The “State of the Australian and New Zealand Workplace 2023” report by Gallup has been released with the good news being that there has been a little improvement in employee engagement levels but , when you look at the numbers, we still have a long way to go.

The report says that 80% of employees are not thriving at work and that low engagement costs Australia and New Zealand AU$245 billion each year.

Notably, the report comments on the fact that four Australian States have already legislated to introduce codes of practice to address psychosocial hazards at work. With the numbers quoted above, it is understandable why Governments are doing that.

What are the current engagement levels?

Focusing on Australia, the report says that just 20% of Australian employees are thriving at work but that is only one point off a record high rating…. and that is a bit of a worry if that is the best that we can do.

It also reports that 67% of our people are present but disengaged and the remaining 13% are actively disengaged.

The reality is that these reports always show that by far the biggest group is those who are present but disengaged. That is consistent with most other studies as well.

What else are the numbers saying?

Other significant statistics are:

  • Nearly 5 in 10 Australian workers say they experienced a lot of stress the previous day with younger people and women the most likely to be stressed.
  • 4 in 10 Australians are actively looking for or watching out for another job.
  • More employees work in hybrid or remote work situations than those who are required just to attend on-site.

What would you change about your workplace to make it better?

This was a question that was asked of the employees who were “present but disengaged” and there were a number of common responses detailed in the report. The really interesting thing with these was that each of the responses can be directly linked to at least one of the psychosocial hazards in Safe Work Australia’s “Model code for managing psychosocial hazards at work”. For example:

  • Response: For everyone to get recognised for their contributions (Hazard: inadequate reward and recognition).
  • Response: I would like it if the managers were more approachable and we could talk openly (Hazard: poor supervisor support).
  • Response: They should grant more autonomy in the work to stimulate everyone’s creativity (Hazard: low job control).
  • Response: I would like to learn more things but the work I do is quite repetitive (Hazard: low job demands).
  • Response: I just wish they respected me more (Hazard: inadequate reward and recognition).
  • Response: Give everyone a fair chance to get promoted (Hazard: poor organisational justice).
  • Response: Clearer goals and stronger guidance (Hazard: unachievable job demands).

Note: more than one psychosocial hazard might be in play in each of these cases.

What can we take from all of that?

When you consider the fact that engagement levels have really not changed that much for years and research consistently shows that only around 1 in 5 workers is really engaged, there is massive opportunity for improvement.

Given that 80% of the workforce is not engaged, it is quite understandable that we have got to the point where a positive duty to eliminate or control psychosocial hazards is progressively being legislated as a new employer obligation across the country. Lack of engagement has clear links to depressive illnesses and is one of the reasons for the escalation in WorkCover costs for claims associated with mental illness or injury.

The good news is that the Model Code produced by Safe Work Australia and the various legislative instruments coming in to play in each State actually provide us with a great roadmap for building highly engaged workforces.

As Gallup says in the report, “…..we have the tools to fix the problem. By changing how leaders manage their employees, organisations can significantly reduce workers’ stress, improving their productivity and wellbeing at the same time”.

Need help?

Our PosWork suite of services have been built to help businesses and their people to “flourish by design”. If you are looking for someone to help you to develop a better workplace, why don’t you give us a call on 1300 108 488 or email info@poswork.com.au to arrange a first free consultation.

 

CONTACT US

PosWork

A Division of Ridgeline Human Resources Pty Ltd
ABN : 24 091 644 094

info@poswork.com.au

6 Ellesmere Ave, Croydon Victoria 3136

1300 108 488

LET'S HAVE A CHAT